Hunting Down The 15 Best Abandoned Places In Louisiana, 2021

To stand in the quiet stillness of a place long abandoned and appreciate the beauty of nature reclaiming its territory, that is the goal of urbex. When wandering in these places we can only imagine the former inhabitants’ lives. A window opens up to us revealing the past witnessed by this aging structure and overgrown gardens. The urban explorer finds adventure in discovering abandoned sites and in uncovering secrets of the past.

Planning, coordination, communication, all of these elements are a part of the adventure. Testing your physical and mental fitness while venturing into the unknown sets a challenge to your capabilities only rewarded by the euphoria of discovering somewhere new. There is much to discover and explore in Louisiana. Wars, fires, recessions, and hurricanes have left their mark on this Gulf Coast state.

Louisiana is home to many abandoned sites with colorful histories, cultural significance, and architectural splendor. Of course, in this state of bayou plantations and French influence, some of the sites are even said to be haunted.

From a power plant to a beer brewery, a Navy base, and a charity hospital, many abandoned sites are waiting to be explored. Get ready to slip back in time and explore the streets of old New Orleans as we countdown the top 10 abandoned places in Louisiana.  

Killer Urbex Note: It is important to note that many of these locations are in an extremely delicate state. Specifics on the locations are not given purposefully to ensure the abandoned places in Louisiana stay as vandalism and destruction-free as possible. Take only photos, leave only footprints.

Interested in venturing outside Louisiana? Here are a few guides to surrounding states that will be helpful in your explorations outside of the wonderful abandoned places in Louisiana:

If you have a specific location from the list below that you would like to immediately get more information about, click the links in the list to snap straight to that abandoned places in Louisiana location.

The Best Abandoned Places in Louisiana

Jazzland, New Orleans Six Flags Amusement Park

Jazzland, New Orleans Six Flags Amusement Park
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by Kristina Rogers via Shutterstock

For many urban explorers in the United States, Six Flags New Orleans is not only one of the most sought-after abandoned places in Louisiana, but also one of the most bucket-listed abandoned locations in the United States.

At the end of August over 15 years ago, the infamous Hurricane Katrina smashed into the Gulf Coast of Louisiana and Mississippi. It devastated New Orleans, breaking through levees and washing out several large portions of the city. Both lives and properties were lost en masse in floodwaters that remained for days after Katrina had dissipated.

This incredibly traumatic natural disaster remains one of the deadliest catastrophes in the history of the United States. While the wrath of Katrina left behind massive destruction to most of the area, it did not spare the popular Six Flags New Orleans “Jazzland” amusement park. The structures and rides of Six Flags New Orleans sank into the tide and then drained, leaving absolute, unrecoverable destruction in its wake, and a post-apocalyptic Wonderland reminiscent of the Chernobyl/Pripyat area amusement park of yesteryear.

Jazzland, New Orleans Six Flags Amusement Park
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by KEG KEG via Shutterstock

The disgusting nature bathwater rose to over six feet, closing in on 10 feet deep in some parts of the theme park. Here, concession stands were flipped and roller coasters were rusted and submerged. If the water had cleared out immediately, the damage may have been recoverable. However, the rainwater, and most importantly metal-corroding saltwater, stayed stagnating throughout Six Flags New Orleans for weeks and ended up destroying almost all of the rides and equipment of the now-depressing example of hurricane-caused abandoned places in Louisiana.

One exception to this total destruction was the famed Batman roller coaster. This ride escaped somewhat unharmed, as the entire ride was built on a type of elevated platform. However, overall the park was deemed far too gone for restoration. It was set for demolition, however the Six Flags Corporation realized it was cheaper to just let the land and rides sit than pay for demolishing and flattening the entire park. As a result, the park fell into extreme disrepair, where it remains to this day. Atlas Obscura describes it best: “a pastel-colored ghost town haunted by silence and disenchantment“.

It should be noted that the ruins of Six Flags New Orleans remain on private property, and the site is considered condemned and dangerous. As a result, it’s important to know how to navigate the potential for trespassing violations. Remember to enter at your own risk, and follow the urban explorer’s motto: Take only photos, leave only footprints.

Dixie Brewing Company New Orleans

Dixie Brewing Company New Orleans
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by William A. Morgan via Shutterstock

Dixie Brewing Company was located at 2401 Tulane Avenue in New Orleans, Louisiana. Brewing beer at this plant since 1907, Dixie survived Prohibition but not Hurricane Katrina. One of the most catastrophic natural events in recent memory, Katrina changed both Dixie Brewing and New Orleans forever.

When the levees broke in August 2005, the monolithic structure was evacuated before the massive flooding overcame it. After the water finally receded, looting began and much of the brewing equipment was stolen. The brewing of the beer continued but in Wisconsin leaving this iconic landmark as one of the most famous abandoned places in Louisiana.

Dixie Brewing Company New Orleans
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by The New Orleans Blight Blog

With plans to return the brewing of Dixie Beer to New Orleans, a lack of funds kept the project from fruition. In 2011, the State of Louisiana seized the aging abandoned brewery. Dixie Brewing filed a lawsuit against the state for the improper seizure but in 2013 a federal judge sided with the state thus preventing the brewery from ever returning to its original facility.

While New Orleans has seen many changes over its existence, Hurricane Katrina left its mark permanently on this structure and others in this list as well. Before repair and renovation, the brewery provided a perfect setting for urbex. Now a medical building for the Veteran’s Administration, you can still see many of the original architectural elements in its updated facade.

Plaza Tower New Orleans

Plaza Tower New Orleans
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by Khairil Azhar Junos via Shutterstock

Plaza Tower office skyscraper can be found at 1001 Howard Avenue, New Orleans, Louisiana. Designed by Leonard Reese Spangenburg & Associates, it opened in 1969 as the tallest building in Louisiana. With 45 floors and a massive multi-story parking garage, the Plaza has over 485,000 square feet of office space. Once bustling with commerce, the Tower now stands as one of the famous abandoned places in Louisiana.

Projecting upper floors give the square tower the appearance of a massive, minimalist column while the alternating pale stones and dark windows create a pop-art zebra-stripe effect. Closed in 2002 due to the presence of black mold and asbestos, the building never lived up to expectations. The growth of high rises continued, but in a different area of New Orleans, leaving the owners bankrupt.

Plaza Tower New Orleans
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by Sean Pavone via Shutterstock

Last sold at auction in 2011 for $650,000, the abandoned office complex remains a curiosity to New Orleans tourists and locals. This property is fenced in and has been abandoned for many years. This tall example of abandoned places in Louisiana stands vacant and decrepit with broken windows and falling tiles all the while maintaining its place in the New Orleans skyline alongside the newer skyscrapers.

EA Conway Memorial Hospital

EA Conway Memorial Hospital
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by Bonnie Bolden via The News Star

The EA Conway Memorial Hospital began its life in 1941 as the Monroe Charity Hospital serving the twelve parishes of Northeast Louisiana. Providing urgently needed care to the community, it served over 100,000 patients its first year. In 1948 the name was changed as a tribute to the late EA Conway, Secretary of State and a Monroe native.

EA Conway Memorial Hospital 2
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by The Happy Madman via YouTube

This busy hospital was a cornerstone of the Monroe community until 1987 when the structure was abandoned for a newer, more modern hospital. Since that time, the EA Conway Memorial Hospital has become one of the most famous abandoned places in Louisiana. Empty operating theaters and aging X-ray equipment are found along patients’ beds and ancient wheelchairs.

A favorite of ghost-hunters, this creepy-looking run-down hospital is said to be haunted by the spirits of former patients, an example of the morbid history found in many abandoned places in Louisiana.

Pirates Cove Water Park

Pirates Cove Water Park
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by DeadlyKnot on YouTube

On Interstate 10, between Lafayette and Lake Charles, stands the remains of the once busy Pirates Cove Waterpark. Another fatality of Hurricane Katrina, the waterpark remained underwater for weeks in August of 2005, long after the hurricane had passed. When the water finally receded, the damage was extensive and the waterpark was left as one of the famous abandoned places in Louisiana.

Pirates Cove Water Park
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by Andy Tucker via Flickr

The remains of this abandoned waterpark are both devastating and beautiful. Log flumes and wading pools long abandoned are now home to birds and alligators. Cars traveling along I-10 wonder at the enormous size of this waterpark.

Several developers have expressed interest in the abandoned site but following the hurricane, zoning law changes and Louisiana politics have made it more difficult to re-open. New ownership has promised to restore the waterpark to its former glory. For now, though, the Pirates Cove Water Park sits as just another example of the interesting abandoned places in Louisiana.

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Market Street Power Plant

Market-Street-Power-Plant.jpg
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by JUZtizByFramz via Shutterstock

The former Market Street Power Plant sits on the banks of the Mississippi River between the waterfront Warehouse District and the Garden District in New Orleans. The power plant was constructed by New Orleans Railway and Light Company in 1905 and produced coal-powered electricity for the growing city. At that time, it was the largest power plant in the South.

Originally only one building, the power plant grew in size, evolving over time. The original brick structure was enormous, encompassing over 160,000 square feet. With its turn-of-the-century practicality and no-frills construction, the utilitarian building gives off a steam-punk vibe. Now softened by graffiti artists’ masterpieces, the power plant is one of the famous abandoned places in Louisiana.

Market-Street-Power-Plant-2.jpg
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by Byron Hart via Shutterstock

The towering twin smokestacks and crumbling industrial facade make the power plant an interesting place for urban exploration. The immense size of the boilers and rooms of gauges and switches are a historical curiosity. Developers have long sought this coveted river-front property and plans are in the works for the original building to be restored and turned into condominiums. It’s dangerous and highly illegal to explore, but is by far one of the most interesting abandoned places in Louisiana.

Exhibit Be Apartments

Exhibit Be Apartments
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by Leland Kent of Abandoned Southeast

This five-story 450-unit housing complex has a long history of crime and violence. Since its opening in 1964, it is one of the oldest and most troubled housing projects in New Orleans. Initially built for the African-American Saints NFL football players, by 1970 it was under the control of HUD and consisted of Section-8 occupants.

Lacking proper management, the complex fell into disrepair with broken elevators, busted water pipes, and rodent and termite infestations. The security gates did not close. It became a dumpsite for discarded tires and rotting trash. Maintenance workers feared working at the complex due to robberies and muggings. NOPD instituted more police presence but it did little to stem the tide of gang violence and drug activity.

Over time, buildings were vacated and condemned moving residents to other buildings in the complex. By 1990, the housing complex was awash in robberies, shootings, and killings. In 1996, HUD demolished 39 abandoned and condemned units. Four years later, a new group of investors took over promising to re-new the complex but were met with only failed inspections and ever-increasing disrepair.

In 2005, Hurricane Katrina caused an additional 135 of the remaining 364 units to be condemned. Finally, in 2012, the last remaining 100 occupants were relocated and the complex was closed.

Exhibit Be Apartments
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by Leland Kent of Abandoned Southeast

In 2014, real estate developer Bill Thomason noticed the work of graffiti artist “BMike” transforming the vandalized abandoned buildings into works of art. Instead of calling the police, Thomason agreed to allow the artists to continue the transformation of the project. The public was invited to view the artwork and schools organized field trips to the site. Over the following months, 30,000 visitors experienced Exhibit Be.

It quickly became a success, attracting media attention nationwide. The mayor visited the site and thanked the artists for their community service. This street-art exhibit was hailed as a social experiment of the dueling nature of graffiti art versus vandalism and as a healing memorial to the last tenants removed due to the hurricane’s destruction. As a result, it is yet another casualty of Katrina adding multitudes to the number of abandoned places in Louisiana.

“Exhibit Be is about the idea of being in the moment, not the past or the future” states creator Brandan “BMike” Odums. Large, colorful murals of famous civil rights leaders and entertainers are depicted all over the walls including portraits of Martin Luther King, the Notorious BIG, Malcolm X, and Mohammed Ali. Exhibit Be revealed street-art and graffiti’s capacity for engaging communities of color as well as the arts community. It is an interesting exploration.

Loews State Palace

Loews State Palace
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by Leland Kent of Abandoned Southeast

Opening on Canal Street in 1926, this $1 Million luxury film palace was originally named The State Theatre. Designed by prominent New York architect Thomas Lamb, the theater is an example of the luxury and finery of New Orleans at that time. Lamb designed the luxurious movie theater featuring Renaissance motifs, Tiffany chandeliers, and plush velvet seating for over 3,000 patrons. Opening day featured a stunning array of silent film stars of the day including Buster Keaton, Jack Mulhall, and Dorothy Mackill.

Owned by Marcus Leow, the man who founded MGM Studios in 1924, his movie palaces were built to showcase Hollywood films and live performances. Crowds flocked to his theater for many years and enjoyed the luxurious surroundings, including a prized 3/13 Robert Morgan organ. In the 1930s the State Theatre was damaged by flooding and the pipe organ was dismantled and moved to the Saenger Theater in Pensacola, Florida.

The property went through changes through the years. It was turned into a multiplex theater and then renovated and returned to its original single theater design in the late 1980s when it was re-named the Loew’s State Palace.

Loews State Palace
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by Leland Kent of Abandoned Southeast

Maintaining the luxury theater’s elegance amidst its decaying facade proved costly and the theater changed hands several times over the coming years. Its popularity once again soared in the mid-1990s when the theater hosted underground rave parties. The documentary “Rise: Story of Rave Outlaw Disco Donnie” highlights the rave scene at the State Palace Theater.

Criminal charges filed against the owners, DEA raids, and Fire Marshall’s attempts at closing the theater all failed but Hurricane Katrina succeeded in permanently closing the venue in 2005. Cleanups were attempted but flooding in the basement caused extensive damage and the building was condemned.

Since then the theater has become a magnet for urbex. As one of the most famous abandoned places in Louisiana, Leow’s State Palace retains its allure of forgotten luxury and elegance amid urban decay.

The Touro-Shakespeare Home

The Touro-Shakespeare Home
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by Leland Kent of Abandoned Southeast

The Touro-Shakespeare Home in New Orleans, Louisiana was named after former city mayor James Shakespeare and philanthropist Judah Touro. Touro, originally a Rhode Island native, made his home in New Orleans before the Civil War. Here he made a fortune in shipping and Louisiana real estate.

Touro, despite being incredibly wealthy, lived humbly and endeared himself to the people of New Orleans by his many charitable contributions to education, healthcare, orphanages, and places of worship. Upon his death, he bequeathed $80,000 for a house for the poor to be under the control of the mayor. In effect, Touro had, through his private gift, started a social-welfare program in an era when this was assumed to be the work of the church.

Destroyed by fire at the end of the civil war, the home was moved to General Meyer’s Avenue in Algiers in 1932. The new home was designed by a local architect William R. Burke. The elegant design includes elements of Neo-Classical Revival and Jacobean Revival. The home sits on the Westbank of the Mississippi River.

The Touro-Shakespeare Home
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by Leland Kent of Abandoned Southeast

The Touro-Shakespeare Home features a prominent front portico, stepped parapets, and diamond-pattern polychrome brickwork on the exterior. The large, multi-story building with its Gothic appearance resembles part cathedral, part fortress, and part castle.

The building served as a city-operated nursing home for over 70 years before it was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The property has been abandoned and left deteriorating ever since. Its beauty fading with the passing of time.

Looters and vandals have laid claim to stained glass windows and church pews. The marvelous gardens and fountains are now dry and overgrown. The 200 seat chapel with its enormous domed ceiling stands empty, the wind whistling through the broken windows and doors.

Urban explorers have re-discovered the original beauty of this facility’s English gardens and its architectural splendor. Urbex enthusiasts have made the Touro-Shakespeare Home in Algiers one of the most famous abandoned places in Louisiana.

NSA New Orleans Complex

NSA New Orleans Complex
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by Leland Kent of Abandoned Southeast

Naval Support Activity (NSA) is an immense complex consisting of three, six-story buildings on the East Bank of the Mississippi River. The three giant buildings that tower over the riverbank each contain over one half million square feet of floor space. Situated on over 30 acres of land, this complex has had a long history at the Louisiana port.

Constructed during World War I, the U.S. Army originally built the enormous complex as a Quartermaster Depot, used for general logistics during the war. The complex was completed in 1919 and has seen many incarnations over the years until it was abandoned in 2011.

While in operation, the naval complex had extensive recreational facilities, 1,800 parking spaces, 1 million square feet of air-conditioned office space, and a parade ground. It was home to 3,900 active duty and 2,700 civilian personnel.

During the 1930s the facility served as a transient center housing men left homeless by the Great Depression. The men did work for the Navy in exchange for room and board. As World War II began, the complex was reverted to full military use as the New Orleans Port of Embarkation.

NSA New Orleans Complex
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by Leland Kent of Abandoned Southeast

Between 1944 and 1966, the complex progressed from a U.S. Navy Station to the U.S. Naval Headquarters. The Army transferred ownership to the Navy, along with its neighboring base on the Algiers riverbank, forming the Naval Activity Support (NSA) Complex, New Orleans in 1966.

Tenants of the base complex included the Marine Corps Reserve and the Navy Reserve. In the early 1970s, the base was re-named the F. Edward Hebert Defense Complex after the New Orleans congressman who served as chairman of the House Armed Services Committee.

In May 2005, BRAC (Base Realignment and Closure Round) moved the Navy headquarters to Virginia, the personnel functions to Tennessee, and closed the Naval Support Activity complex. Soon after the Navy left, the Marines moved and the base has been vacant since 2011.

The Navy employs a small security staff and a caretaker to maintain the facility. At the dock, the Cape Knox, a naval ship, can be seen ready to go into action if needed. But the shuttered base appears deserted with knee-high weeds and graffiti covering the exterior.

Since 2016 the city of New Orleans has proposed many different uses for this valuable riverfront property including a proposed cruise ship terminal and art and culture center. Although plans are in place, the complex remains abandoned, and the site remains on our list of the best abandoned places in Louisiana.

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General Laundry Building (New Orleans)

General Laundry Building
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by Abandoned Baton Rouge

Near the corner of St. Peter and North Rocheblave streets in the heart of New Orleans’ Seventh Ward stands a long-abandoned architectural jewel: the striking Art Deco design of the former General Laundry Building.

Constructed in 1930 after a massive fire consumed the company’s previous headquarters, General Laundry, Cleaners and Dyers president Robert Chapoit commissioned the structure from the Shreveport-based architectural firm of Jones, Roessel, Olschner and Wiener.

The building hewed closely to the Art Deco style popular at the time, with its bright blue, pink and green geometric shapes and flourishes, yellow fluted columns, bold lines and blocky sans-serif font inscribing the company’s name on the exterior. These extra flourishes weren’t limited to the structure’s façade; inside, the business held monthly fashion shows where guests could sip champagne and watch models introduce the latest styles.

Unfortunately, the popularity of the home washing machine soon drove the company into obsolescence, and Chapoit sold the distinctive building in 1945. In the years since, it has changed hands—and faced demolition—several times. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974, saving it from a U.S. Postal Service plan to knock it down and build a new facility in its place.

General Laundry Building
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by Abandoned Baton Rouge

The USPS sold it to current owner Southern Recycling in 1986, with a restriction on the title that prevented any changes to the exterior without the approval of the State Historic Preservation Office.

Southern Recycling has since petitioned the city’s Neighborhood Conservation District Commission to allow for its demolition and replacement with a modern, low-maintenance metal warehouse, but the City Council has opted not to rule on the request, leaving it in a state of indefinite limbo.

Meanwhile, virtually no effort has been made to preserve the unique appearance of the historic building. Through the layers of soot, grime and graffiti that have accumulated over the decades, the building’s colorful grandeur is still evident.

Civil Defense Control Center (New Orleans)

Civil Defense Control Center
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by Faimon A. Roberts III via the New Orleans Advocate

As the Cold War escalated in the years following World War II, the United States began developing a broad strategy to guide local agencies in responding to a possible nuclear attack.

The Civil Defense initiative was established by the Louisiana state legislature in 1950 with the creation of the state’s Civil Defense Agency, which in turn authorized municipalities to “prepare for, coordinate, and carry out all emergency measures other than military, necessary to minimize and repair injury and damage resulting from disasters caused by enemy attacks or other hostile action, or by fire, flood, earthquakes, or other natural causes.”

In New Orleans, the Civil Defense program included a network of 76 sirens to warn residents of the imminent emergency and the designation of multiple fallout shelters, including the basements of the Main Library and City Hall.

Civil Defense Control Center
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by Faimon A. Roberts III via the New Orleans Advocate

Additionally, the city constructed a secure underground bunker from which officials could direct the emergency response operations. Despite its covert nature, the bunker’s location is somewhat conspicuous, given the small hill it created in an otherwise pancake-flat neighborhood.

The bunker was never used for its intended purpose, although the city maintained it for several decades due to the potential for threats to New Orleans’ robust shipping industry. Eventually, the site was abandoned, and lack of maintenance resulted in flood waters breaching its lower floors. The defunct bunker remains in its original location, hiding in plain sight between Ponchartrain and West End boulevards.

Kisatchie High School (Provencal)

Kisatchie High School
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by Logan Monroe of Gonzoform.com

In the remote Kisatchie National Forest in central Louisiana, observant visitors may notice a nearly-forgotten piece of local history in the form of an abandoned schoolhouse.

Kisatchie High School first opened its doors in 1912, when three existing schools decided to consolidate: Kisatchie Union School, established in 1848; Kisatchie School, which opened in 1862; and the private Shilo School, established in 1890.

By 1920, the student body exceeded the modest building’s capacity, and members of the tightly-knit community came together to build a new facility with their own hands. Men, women and even the youth worked together to make bricks, cut wood, and clear land, completing construction in an impressive two-year timespan.

Kisatchie High School
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by Logan Monroe of Gonzoform.com

Five students made up the school’s first graduating class in 1927, after which it was accepted into the state education system. By 1931, the building was in need of structural repairs, which it received in the form of professionally installed stucco siding to replace the homemade bricks and other materials used by community builders two decades earlier.

Their work has stood the test of time, as it remains standing nearly 60 years after the school closed in 1962 due to plummeting enrollment. Though both the interior and exterior of the building are covered in graffiti and many of its doors have been torn from their hinges, the walls and roof appear to be structurally sound.

Rusted radiators still line the edges of the modest classrooms, and chunks of plaster and wood litter the floors. With virtually no public pressure to either preserve or demolish this enduring piece of community history, it seems likely to stand quietly along this rural roadway for the foreseeable future. 

Elise Reuss Memorial School (White Castle)

Elise Reuss Memorial School
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by Shanna Riley via Flickr

At first glance, this small, dilapidated brick structure near White Castle in Iberville Parish appears to be an abandoned residence. But upon closer examination, visitors will notice a pair of modest marble panels on the building’s façade that reveal its true history.

One panel’s inscription reads, “Elise Reuss Memorial School, Erected 1907, To the loving memory of our daughter Elise Bertha Christine Reuss, Born June 9th 1890, Died November 19th 1894.” The companion plaque lists the firms responsible for the school’s construction: Architects Mackenzie, Goldstein and Biggs and Builders Lydien Colet and S.P. Braud.

Elise Reuss Memorial School
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by Shanna Riley via Flickr

The school’s namesake was the daughter of wealthy sugar farmer George B. Reuss, who was born in New Orleans in 1858, shortly after his parents emigrated from Germany. Reuss was an only child who inherited several vast plantations from his father, who cultivated corn as well as thousands of acres of sugar cane. George Reuss and his wife Bertha had four children: Helene, Ethelyn, Gussie and Elise.

Though little is known about what caused four-year-old Elise’s premature death, her memory lives on in the form of the now-abandoned school building, which is now slowly being taken over by nature. Thick vines cover the exterior walls, and parts of the roof have rotted away. Most of the windows have been broken out, allowing water and wind to damage the walls and flooring inside.

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Charles Boldt Paper Mill (New Iberia)

Charles Boldt Paper Mill
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by Logan Monroe via Behance

For more than a decade, the Charles Boldt Paper Mill provided jobs to dozens of families in this modest town just outside Lafayette. Unfortunately, the economic devastation wrought by the Great Depression forced the mill’s closure just 13 years after it opened, and the sprawling brick building has been abandoned ever since.

The mill was originally a passion project of local resident A.C. Bernard, whose efforts to bring new commerce to the city included convincing the Cincinnati-based company to build one of its manufacturing facilities in New Iberia. Boldt invested in 18 acres along the Bayou Teche, and construction of the mill took a year to complete at a cost of approximately $500,000.

After the mill closed in 1934, the vacant property spent the next six decades hosting unauthorized visitors that included teenagers, photographers, vandals and vagrants, some of whom set up residence in the catacomb-like chambers that once served as engine rooms and storage space on the mill’s lower level.

In 2002, local residents Greg Mouton and Missy Johnson purchased the derelict property, but several redevelopment plans—including transforming the old mill into a restaurant and RV park—failed to come to fruition.

Charles Boldt Paper Mill
Abandoned places in Louisiana image by Logan Monroe via Behance

The new owners flooded the facility’s lower levels to deter trespassers from camping out there, but the constant appearance of new graffiti, trash and other detritus suggests that dozens of people still wander the site each week. Trees, vines and other growth have largely taken over the crumbling brick structure’s second story, and bright splashes of spray paint cover virtually every inch of exposed concrete. Outside the main building, the cylindrical brick smokestack still towers over the property, although it too is beginning to deteriorate due to age and the elements.

The property owners have suggested they may still attempt to repurpose the site at some point—perhaps as an event venue—but for now, the decaying facility remains primarily a destination for urban explorers and curiosity-seekers in the region. All in all, it’s one of the best abandoned places in Louisiana to explore.

Our Final Thoughts on Abandoned Places in Louisiana

With many abandoned sites across the United States waiting to be explored, take time to check out these famous abandoned places in Louisiana. If you live in-state or plan to travel here soon, these 10 sites deserve your attention. The unique culture and history of this state make it a must-see for any urban explorer. Adventure awaits in the Bayou State. 

Those who are into urban exploration in the Louisiana state area, and wanting to explore abandoned places in Louisiana, should get comfortable with Louisiana trespassing laws. Luckily, in the state of Louisiana, the laws are easy to understand and are pretty cut and dry.

For these cases, you should familiarize yourself with x. For more about obtaining permission to explore abandoned places in Louisiana, check out our guide Explore Abandoned Buildings: How To Get Permission.

Additional Urban Exploration Resources